Archive for the ‘Fall River News’ Category

Diablo Valley Fly-Fishermen Donate to Protect Fall River

/ November 28th, 2011 / Comments Off on Diablo Valley Fly-Fishermen Donate to Protect Fall River

FRC would like to thank the Diablo Valley Fly-Fishermen (DVFF) for their generous donation.  This funding will be used to stop the spread of Eurasian watermilfoil throughout the Fall River.  The money will be matched with additional private individual donations and foundation dollars to help launch a Eurasian Water milfoil Pilot Program targeted for the summer of 2012. To learn more about the Diablo Valley Fly-Fishermen, click here.

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PGE Commits $20k to Fall River Milfoil Management Program

/ November 28th, 2011 / Comments Off on PGE Commits $20k to Fall River Milfoil Management Program

PGE Milfoil Harvester at Work

This fall, PGE committed $20k in funding to help launch a pilotprogram that will explore the use of the milfoil weevil as a biological control for EWM.

Under their Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hydropower license (FERC project 2687), PGE is required to maintain the structural integrity of the Fall River’s extensive levee system.

EWM threatens the integrity of this levee system by impeding natural flows, which raises the water level of the river and puts pressure on the levees. PGE monitors this pressure and at certain “action” levels, they begin mechanically removing the milfoil to accelerate flows and relieve pressure.

Mechanical removal of milfoil is costly.  According to Chip Stalica, former Hydro-Operations Manager for the Fall River, harvesting can cost tens of thousands of dollars each year depending on how bad the seasonal outbreak is.  Another major concern with harvesting is that it possibly spreads milfoil by fragmenting the plant, allowing the highly invasive species to regenerate elsewhere throughout the river.  To avoid this, PGE uses an aquatic harvester that captures plant fragments as it cuts. The cuttings are then off-loaded onto dry land.  Unfortunately, some fragments escape the harvester and float down river, potentially exacerbating the problem.

Due to the money and time it takes to harvest EWM, PGE supports research that explores the potential for alternative management strategies. PGE’s donation will allow FRC and the USDA Agricultural Research Service to work together to explore potential management strategies.

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Circle 7 Guest Ranch Partners with FRC to Restore Wild Trout Habitat

/ November 28th, 2011 / Comments Off on Circle 7 Guest Ranch Partners with FRC to Restore Wild Trout Habitat

New Cattle Exclusion Fencing will Protect Stream Banks at the Circle 7 Ranch

This fall, FRC and the Circle 7 Guest Ranch formed a partnership to begin restoring the stream bank along their 3.5 acres of the river front property.

FRC used grant funding to match a generous contribution from owner-operator Dan Smith.  With the combined funding, Smith constructed over one mile of fencing that will help keep cattle from destroying the stream bank.

“It’s the right thing to do,” says Dan Smith, “the Smith family believes in contributing to the welfare of the river and we’re glad to work with FRC on protecting important habitat.”

The Circle 7 Ranch is approximately 700 acres and has been a working ranch for over 40 years.  This successful partnership between Circle 7 and FRC demonstrates how simple it can be to protect the river while also maintaining a working cattle ranch.

 

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FRC Partners with USDA to Explore Solutions to Milfoil Problem

/ November 28th, 2011 / Comments Off on FRC Partners with USDA to Explore Solutions to Milfoil Problem

Eurasian Watermilfoil at the USDA Lab

Over the last year, the Fall River Conservancy has been exploring options for reducing the spread of Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM) throughout the Fall River.  One of these options, utilizing a biological control known as the milfoil weevil, presents a hopeful solution for combatting EWM.

FRC is proud to announce a new partnership with the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS). The purpose of this partnership is to assess the feasibility of successfully using weevils to control Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM). USDA is currently working with live weevils in their Albany laboratory where they are simulating the cold water conditions of the Fall River. By observing how weevils interact with EWM under these conditions, they will be able to better assess the potential effectiveness of a full scale bio-control program.

Although weevils are known to destroy EWM in lake systems throughout the Midwest, the cold, spring-fed water of the Fall River presents new challenges. New research conducted by USDA, shows that small variations in water temperature can play a critical role in the developmental life cycle of weevils. Weevils have what is called a “developmental base temperature” of 10° Celsius (50°F).  At this temperature, weevils become active, but they won’t lay eggs until water temperatures reach approximately 15° Celsius (59°F). In the upper Fall River near Island Road Bridge, summer temperatures average around 14° Celsius (57°F).

To address this issue, FRC and USDA will be looking for small off-channel ponds where we can successfully propagate self-sustaining populations.  USDA and FRC will continue working together to ensure that any future biological control program will lead to a successful outcome.

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Meet Erin Donley: UC Davis Ph.d Program and USDA Fall River Researcher

/ November 28th, 2011 / Comments Off on Meet Erin Donley: UC Davis Ph.d Program and USDA Fall River Researcher

Erin Donley and FRC board member Ray Christensen at the USDA Lab

Dear Fall River Community,

My name is Erin Donley. I recently joined the team of researchers at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) who are studying the Fall River, its native aquatic life and the invasive plant populations that are currently proliferating in the watershed. The research activities I perform on the Fall River will also guide my work as a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Davis.

My background is in water resource management, including: river and estuary restoration, climate change impacts on instream flows for salmonid populations, aquatic entomology and water resources policy. I received a Master’s of Science in aquatic ecology and a Master’s of Public Administration in water policy from the University of Washington. I also hold a Bachelor of Science from the University of California, Berkeley in natural resource management – with an emphasis in biological monitoring using aquatic insects. My current research interests include characterizing the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities on the Fall River as a function of Eurasian watermilfoil invasion, assessing the influence of Eurasian watermilfoil on nutrient cycling within the Fall River and simulating possible ecosystem response to potential riparian restoration scenarios.

Although I am a native Californian, it wasn’t until recently that I made my first visit to the Fall River. The beauty of the valley took my breath away. As I followed the river’s winding course by boat, I took in the Autumn color of the deciduous trees scattered among the surrounding pines, spotted sizable rainbow trout darting in deep pools and even had the pleasure of witnessing an impressive mayfly emergence event at sun set. I am very grateful to have been granted the opportunity to engage in research in a place so rich with life and intriguing opportunities for study. If you happen to encounter me on the river or in town, please feel free to introduce yourself and I will certainly do the same.

Best wishes,

Erin

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Eurasian Watermilfoil Pilot Program: Question and Answer

/ April 14th, 2011 / Comments Off on Eurasian Watermilfoil Pilot Program: Question and Answer

The Fall River Resource Conservation District (RCD), the Fall River Conservancy (FRC), and California Trout, are joining forces to implement a pilot program that will help restore wild trout populations and critical habitat conditions in the Fall River by reducing the spread of Eurasian Watermilfoil (EWM), Myriophyllum spicatum.

Please find below, answers to key questions regarding the proposed project:

 

What is the purpose of this program?

The purpose of this project is to restore Fall River habitat and wild trout populations by reducing the spread of invasive Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM) Myriophyllum spicatum.  First discovered 1999, EWM has spread rapidly in the lower river, overtaking native aquatic plants and destroying sensitive habitat for fish and macro-invertebrates.  EWM also degrades the Fall River levee system, which causes flooding and threatens the valley’s agricultural commodities.

 

Why is this project necessary?

EWM poses a considerable long-term threat to the economic and ecological health of the Fall River Valley. Although Fall River stakeholders differ significantly in demographics, we share a common interest in the general economic, cultural, and ecological well-being of the valley.  EWM threatens this common interest. EWM impacts recreation, hydropower, agriculture, water quality, and fish and wildlife.

 

Who will pay, how much will it cost, and how long will it take?

The Fall River Partnership mentioned above is working together to raise $125,000 to implement a two year pilot program for managing EWM in the Fall River.  Money raised will go towards working with EnviroScience Inc. to propagate a biological control (weevils), distribute the weevils in strategic locations throughout the river, and then monitor the results to ensure that the intended impact occurs.

After two years, we’ll monitor the impact of the program to determine whether additional resources should be invested in the program.  The California Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Regional Water Quality Control Board will provide regulatory oversight and guidance to ensure that all necessary permits and procedures are followed.

The Fall River Partnership is currently working with the USDA and PG&E to secure partial funding for this project.   But we also need private support and individual donations to meet our funding needs.

Click here to make a donation that will help us stop the spread of Eurasian watermilfoil

 

What is Eurasian watermilfoil?

Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM), Myriophyllum spicatum L. is an invasive, submerged aquatic plant found in most of the United States and portions of Canada.  Its native range is Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa but since its first introduction in the 1940’s, it has become one of the most noxious aquatic weeds in North America.

 

How does EWM affect the Fall River?

In 2003, broad areas of EWM in the lower river reached sufficient density and height to significantly impede flow, which caused water to back up in upstream areas.  This culminated in the failure of large sections of levee along Horr pond and the flooding of approximately 4,000 acres of agricultural lands.

Beyond the destruction of field crops, EWM also impacts other important economic drivers of the regional economy including outdoor recreation.  The Fall River is considered one of California’s most productive spring creek wild trout fisheries.  EWM degrades the Fall River’s sensitive cold-water habitat and wild trout populations by reducing the diversity and abundance of native plants, as well as associated invertebrate populations.

 

What is a biological control?

A biological control is the practice of rearing and releasing natural enemies (predators and parasites) that seek out and destroy other species that are considered pests. In the case of EWM, control is defined as a condition where EWM is reduced to the point where it becomes a relatively small part of the overall plant community.

 

What is a milfoil weevil?

The milfoil weevil, Euhrychiopsis lecontei Dietz, is a small (think sesame seed), aquatic weevil native to North America that feeds on and lives in Eurasian watermilfoil: killing it in the process.  Interestingly, milfoil weevils prefer invasive EWM over all other aquatic plants. Milfoil weevils have no known negative impact on desirable native aquatic vegetation, wild trout, macro-invertebrates, agricultural commodities or people.

 

How will milfoil weevils control the EWM problem?

The milfoil weevil damages EWM directly at the growing tip and the supporting stem. Damage to the stem by milfoil weevil larvae effectively reduces the plant’s ability to grow higher in the water column where it thrives by accessing more light to photosynthesize into energy.

The larval stage creates holes in the stem walls as it moves in and out, hollowing out the stem tissue. This internal damage disrupts the flow of nutrients throughout the plant and to the roots, where energy is stored for subsequent growth.

In addition, holes in the stem allow gas to escape and cause the plant to lose buoyancy. As the stem begins to fall over it weighs down nearby stems, pulling them further from the water’s surface. All of these effects serve to reduce EWM growth, density, and expansion and allow native plants to fill in as EWM drops out of the water column.

 

Won’t milfoil weevils also destroy desired native aquatic plants?

According to information in the peer-reviewed literature on the milfoil weevil (Euhrychiopsis lecontei) the milfoil weevil can damage several native milfoils in addition to Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum).

Specifically, research presented by Dr. Raymond M. Newman (Arch. Hydrobiol. 159 pages 145 – 184) indicates that the water milfoil weevil will feeds upon and damage M. sibiricum (northern watermilfoil), whorl-leaf milfoil (M. verticillatum), alternateflower milfoil (M. alterniflorum),low watermilfoil (M. humile), and parrot’s feather (M. aquaticum).

The Newman article indicates that the native host plants of the milfoil weevil include northern watermilfoil (M. sibiricum) and other native watermilfoils such as whorl-leaf milfoil (M. verticillatum). This means that the weevil is capable of completing its life cycle and surviving in the presence of these plants even when no Eurasian watermilfoil is present in the water body.

Other than the research presented above, milfoil weevils have no known negative impact on other desirable native aquatic vegetation, wild trout, macro-invertebrates, agricultural commodities, or people.  Weevils destroy EWM gradually.  As the once dominant EWM begins to die, native aquatic plants can begin to grow again.

 

Will milfoil weevils affect agricultural commodities in any way?

Milfoil weevils have no known negative impact on desirable native aquatic vegetation, wild trout, macro-invertebrates, agricultural commodities or people.  Milfoil weevils only affect Eurasian milfoil and hybrid milfoil species and will not impact other species in or out of the water. Weevils have been used regularly on lakes in the Midwest for over 10 years: no agricultural commodities or desirable aquatic vegeation have ever been negatively impacted.

 

Will milfoil weevils affect wild trout populations in anyway?

Milfoil weevils have no known negative impact on desirable native aquatic vegetation, wild trout, macro-invertebrates, agricultural commodities or people.  Milfoil weevils will likely benefit wild trout populations by restoring the original diversity and abundance of the Fall River’s aquatic plant and macro-invertebrate communities.

 

What results do we hope to achieve with this approach?

Most biological control programs do not completely eradicate the pest, but manage it at reduced levels.  This project will decrease EWM plant density, reduce the existing canopy at the river’s surface to a non-nuisance level, and in many cases, eliminate large outbreaks all together.  The project will also restore native plant species and invertebrate abundance and diversity in areas once dominated by EWM.

 

How will we measure the impact of this program?

Baseline measurements on the size and severity of the milfoil problem will be taken prior to stocking and three additional follow-up surveys will be conducted over the next two years.  Data collection will be performed by EnviroScience Inc. with oversight and guidance provided by USDA-NIFA researchers.

 

What unintended consequences may result from this program?

Based on more than two decades of research and twelve years of commercial stocking experience, the milfoil weevil has been well-documented to attack only EWM and does not damage any other aquatic or terrestrial plants. As EWM decreases in the treated system, the weevil population gradually declines to a self-sustaining level. They don’t swarm, bite, or get into your house!

 

Does the community support this approach?

The following agricultural and livestock stakeholders strongly support alternatives for managing EWM in the Fall River Valley:

  1. Intermountain Hay Growers
  2. Northeastern California Water Association
  3. Fall River Wild Rice Cooperation
  4. Prather Ranch Organic Beef
  5. Shasta County Agricultural Commission
  6. California Invasive Plant Council
  7. Fall River Big Valley Cattleman’s Association

The following resource agencies, conservation groups, and research entities are working together to develop long-term solutions for improving native aquatic vegetation and associated macro-invertebrate populations in the Fall River:

  1. The California Department of Fish and Game
  2. The California Regional Water Quality Control Board
  3. California Trout
  4. The Fall River Conservancy
  5. The Fall River Resource Conservation District
  6. UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences

 

 

 

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Restoring the Fall River: Background, Problem, Solution

/ April 14th, 2011 / Comments Off on Restoring the Fall River: Background, Problem, Solution

Click here to donate now:

 

Or Send Checks To:

Fall River Conservancy

Gift Processing

P.O. Box 395

Fall River Mills 96028

 

Restoring the Fall River

The Fall River originates from California’s largest network of cold-water springs.  In total, the entire system generates approximately 890 million gallons per day—over one million acre feet annually—of cold, clean water.   For perspective, that’s more than 10 times the city of San Francisco’s total annual water use!  The value of this water to our community—and the environment—is almost immeasurable.  We use the water for agriculture, hydropower, municipal drinking supply, and outdoor recreation. Moreover,  large wild trout thrive in this nutrient rich, spring water.

But over the last 10 years an unwelcome visitor has gradually established roots in the Fall River: Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM), Myriophyllum spicatum L.

EWM threatens our ability to fully capitalize on our most valuable resource: cold, clean, plentiful water.  EWM impedes natural flows, destroys levees, floods crops, degrades wild trout populations, and destroys the natural order of the Fall River ecosystem.  Additionally, PG&E spends tens of thousands of dollars annually trying to keep the problem under control using a mechanical harvester that may actually exacerbate the problem.

Background and Problem

Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM) is an invasive, submerged aquatic plant found throughout most of North America.  Over the last 50 years, it’s become one of the most noxious aquatic weeds in the western United States. First identified in the Fall River in 1999, EWM now infests large portions of the lower river.  Although its origins remain unknown, EWM spreads rapidly when plant fragments get redistributed throughout the river by boat props, mechanical harvesting, and other natural methods.  EWM grows extremely fast, forming thick mats in the river that impede flows and causes major flooding events.  EWM also displaces native aquatic plants that bugs and fish rely on for survival.

Eurasian Watermilfoil (EWM)

2003 Levee Breach

Solution

The Fall River Partnership—Fall River Conservancy, California Trout, and the Fall River Resource Conservation District—have joined forces to develop a viable strategy for managing EWM. In the summer of 2011, this partnership will carry out a two year pilot project that uses a biological control—the milfoil weevil—to systematically reduce the spread of EWM.

The milfoil weevil, Euhrychiopsis lecontei, is a small aquatic weevil that lives and feeds only on EWM.  Once introduced, milfoil weevils eat away at EWM until populations decline to manageable levels. Milfoil weevils do not negatively affect fish populations, native aquatic vegetation, agricultural crops, or any other sensitive species in the Fall River Valley –including people.  As the weevils gradually destroy EWM, native aquatic plants begin to regenerate, bringing with them the diversity and abundance of macroinvertebrates that the Fall River was once known for.  The final result?  More bugs and more aquatic plants mean more fat wild trout!

The Milfoil Weevil

Cost Estimate

The Fall River Partnership mentioned above is working together to raise $125,000 to implement a two year pilot program for managing EWM in the Fall River.  Money raised will go towards hiring a professional contractor, EnviroScience Inc., to propagate the biological control (weevils), distribute the weevils in strategic locations throughout the river, and then monitor the results to ensure that the intended impact occurs.

After two years, we’ll monitor the impact of the program to determine whether additional resources should be invested in the program.  The California Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Regional Water Quality Control Board will provide regulatory oversight and guidance to ensure that all necessary permits and procedures are followed.

 

We Need Your Help:  Please Make a Donation to Help Manage EWM in the Fall River

The Fall River Valley has a unique culture of farming, ranching, and community. The Fall River Partnership is passionate about working closely with community members, landowners, agricultural operators, ranchers, and other stakeholders to devise workable solutions for achieving a common goal. Although Fall River stakeholders differ significantly in demographics, we share a common interest in the general economic, cultural and ecological well-being of the valley.  EWM threatens this common interest. Please help our community address this problem by making a donation today.

The Fall River Partnership believes in working within the community to constructively solve problems.  We also believe in taking personal responsibility for managing the extraordinary natural resources of the Fall River Valley.

 

Please visit our website to make a tax deductible donation:  www.fallriverconserancy.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Eurasian Watermilfoil Pilot Program

/ April 14th, 2011 / Comments Off on Eurasian Watermilfoil Pilot Program

Click here to donate now

Or Send Checks To:

Fall River Conservancy

Gift Processing

P.O. Box 395

Fall River Mills 96028

 

We Need Your Help:  Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM) is overtaking the Fall River

The Fall River Partnership—Fall River Conservancy, California Trout, and the Fall River Resource Conservation District—have joined forces to develop a viable strategy for managing Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM).   In the summer of 2011, this partnership will carry out a two year pilot project that uses a biological control—the milfoil weevil—to systematically reduce the spread of EWM.

The milfoil weevil, Euhrychiopsis lecontei, is a small aquatic weevil that lives and feeds only on EWM. Once introduced, milfoil weevils eat away at EWM until populations decline to manageable levels.

Milfoil weevils do not negatively affect fish populations, native aquatic vegetation, agricultural crops, or any other sensitive species in the Fall River Valley –including people.

Click on the links below for more information:

  1. Restoring the Fall River: Background, Problem, Solution
  2. Eurasian watermilfoil: Question and Answer

Cost Estimate

The Fall River Partnership mentioned above is working together to raise $125,000 to implement a two year pilot program for managing EWM in the Fall River.  Money raised will go towards working with EnviroScience Inc. to propagate a biological control (weevils), distribute the weevils in strategic locations throughout the river, and then monitor the results to ensure that the intended impact occurs.

After two years, we’ll monitor the impact of the program to determine whether additional resources should be invested in the program.  The California Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Regional Water Quality Control Board will provide regulatory oversight and guidance to ensure that all necessary permits and procedures are followed.

The Fall River Partnership is currently working with the USDA and PG&E to secure partial funding for this project.   But we also need private support and individual donations to meet our funding goals and demonstrate that we have local support from the community.

Please donate now to support this program.

Click here to make a donation

Community Approach

The Fall River Partnership believes in working within the community to constructively solve problems and in taking personal responsibility for managing the extraordinary natural resources of the Fall River Valley.  Although Fall River stakeholders differ significantly in demographics, we share a common interest in the general economic, cultural and ecological well-being of the valley.

EWM threatens this common interest.  Please help our community address this problem by making a donation today.

This project originated from the ground up: from within our community. Your donation demonstrates that we as community can solve problems using non-adversarial strategies.

 

Thank you for joining our cause.

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Andrew Braugh,

Program Director

 

 

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McConnell Fund Commits $23k to Fall River Restoration;

/ August 20th, 2010 / Comments Off on McConnell Fund Commits $23k to Fall River Restoration;

Shasta Regional Community Foundation and McConnell Foundation help protect the Fall River: 

The Fall River Conservancy is proud to announce a new partnership with the Shasta Regional Community Foundation (SRCF).  SRCF recently awarded the conservancy $23,000 through the McConnell Fund Community Partners Grant program. 

The Fall River Conservancy would like to thank both SRCF and the McConnell Foundation for helping us carry out our mission of protecting the lands, waters, and cultural heritage of the Fall River Valley.  The Fall River is California’s largest cold-water spring source.  The river supports agriculture, hydro-power, outdoor recreation, and a world-class wild trout fishery.  The Fall River Conservancy works within the local community to design conservation strategies that lead to long-term, measurable impact.

Purpose of the Grant:

Community Partners Grants are awarded to Shasta and Siskiyou county organizations in the areas of arts and culture; children, youth and education; community vitality; environment; health care; recreation and social services. Grants primarily fund the purchase of equipment or building-related projects. Organizations in Shasta and Siskiyou counties with project budgets from $10,001 to $50,000 are invited to apply to this program. This program involves panels from each county in proposal review.

Although the program is administered by SRCF, the McConnell Foundation provides that actual funding.  The McConnell Foundation is a private, independent foundation whose mission is “To help build better communities through philanthropy.”

Difference the Project will Make:

  1. The project will help researchers identify factors that affect the health of the Fall River
  2. The project informs the local community and general public about factors that may be degrading water quality, habitat conditions, and wild trout populations or other wildlife
  3. Information from the project can be used by the local community to better understand the relationship between land-use practices, water use, and water quality
  4. The project will help FRC and its partners design and prioritize restoration projects based on sound, objective science 

The Fall River Conservancy looks forward to implementing the work outlined in the grant throughout the Summer of 2010 and the Spring of 2011.  Feel free to contact the Fall River Conservancy with questions or concerns at 530-440-5921 or drewbraugh@fallriverconservancy.org.  Also, be sure to check out our new website at www.fallriverconservancy.org.

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UC Davis Watershed Sciences Partners with Fall River Conservancy

/ August 20th, 2010 / Comments Off on UC Davis Watershed Sciences Partners with Fall River Conservancy

About the UCD Center for Watershed Sciences

The Center for Watershed Sciences, a unit of the John Muir Institute of the Environment, is dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of critical issues in watershed science — with a focus on the sustainable and cost-effective restoration and management of stream, lake and estuarine ecosystems.

New Knowledge for a New Era

The next great advances in water resource management will occur at the intersection between disciplines. Single-species or single-issue approaches have failed to resolve water resource challenges, particularly within California and the western United States. The center was created to address the demand for more creative, integrated, and multi-objective approaches to watershed science and policy. Along with developing novel monitoring and research programs, the center is training a new generation of scientists, engineers and managers who can work across multiple disciplines.

Watershed Science Center Approach

  • The Center for Watershed Sciences conducts problem-solving research in restoration and water resource management, principally within the Central Valley, Sierra Nevada, Coast Range and San Francisco Estuary of California.
  • The center seeks to evaluate and address critical uncertainties in watershed, riverine, riparian, floodplain and tidal marsh restoration and conservation efforts.
  • Center projects typically involve teams of researchers drawn from both the physical and biological sciences that work in partnership with public and private agencies.
  • The center seeks to produce notable peer-reviewed contributions to the literature in the environmental sciences and apply this knowledge to solving practical problems related to watershed management.
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